Bioterrorism, Public Health and the Law 
Law 801: Health Care Law Seminar
Professor Vernellia R. Randall

Air and Blood Borne Diseases

 

Syllabus
Resources
Lesson Schedule
00: Intro to the Course
01: Intro to the Problem
02: Public Health System
03: Real Threat?
04: Public Health Law
05: Disease-Reporting
06: Quarantine
07: Model Act
08: Military Presence
09: Health Law Revisited

 

 Ohio Admin. Code 3701-3-022 AIR- AND BLOOD-BORNE DISEASES REASONABLY LIKELY TO BE TRANSMITTED TO EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES WORKERS

(A) Section 3701.248 of the Revised Code allows an emergency medical services worker to ask a health care facility or coroner to notify them of the results of tests for certain diseases, if the worker believes that he or she had a significant exposure through contact with a patient. The diseases subject to this procedure are contagious or infectious diseases that the public health council, by rule, has specified as reasonably likely to be transmitted by air or blood during the normal course of an emergency medical services worker's duties. The diseases listed in paragraph (B) of this rule are specified for purposes of section 3701.248 of the Revised Code.

(B) The following diseases are specified as reasonably likely to be transmitted by air or blood during the normal course of an emergency medical worker's duties:

(1) Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever;

(2) Diphtheria;

(3) Ebola-marburg virus infection;

(4) Fifth disease (human parvovirus infection);

(5) Hansen's disease (leprosy);

(6) Acute or chronic infection with hepatitis B virus;

(7) Acute or chronic infection with hepatitis C virus;

(8) Infection with delta hepatitis virus;

(9) Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related illnesses;

(10) Infection with human t-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2);

(11) Lassa fever;

(12) Leishmaniasis, visceral (Kala-Azar);

(13) Leptospirosis;

(14) Listeriosis pneumonia;

(15) Measles (rubeola);

(16) Meningococcal infection (neisseria meningitidis);

(17) Mumps (infectious parotitis);

(18) Pertussis (whooping cough);

(19) Pneumonic plague (yersinia pestis);

(20) Rabies;

(21) Rubella (German measles);

(22) Tuberculosis; and

(23) Varicella (herpes zoster) infection, including chicken-pox, disseminated varicella, varicella pneumonia, and shingles.

CREDIT(S)

HISTORY: 1997-98 OMR 3340 (RRD); 1991-92 OMR 1304 (E), eff. 3-8-92

RC 119.032 rule review date(s): 9-1-03

<General Materials (GM) - References, Annotations, or Tables>

CROSS REFERENCES

RC 3701.248, Emergency medical services worker access to information on

exposure to contagious or infectious disease

LIBRARY REFERENCES

OJur 3d: 53, Health and Sanitation 49

Koch, Administrative Law and Practice, Processes for information services-- required reports, Text 2.42

 
 
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Home ] Up ] Ohio Admin. Code  3701-3-01 DEFINITIONS ] Diseases to be Reported ] REPORTING OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES ] [ Air and Blood Borne Diseases ] Reportable Disease Notification ] Laboratory Result Reporting ] Time of Report ] Reporting to Department ] Release of Medical Records ]
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Last Updated:
 11/30/2002

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