SOUND PATTERNS

A Structural Examination of Tonality, Vocabulary, Texture,
Sonorities, and Time Organization in Western Art Music

by PHILLIP MAGNUSON

CHROMATIC PROCEDURES I

Chapter 22. Hybrid Areas

Chapter 20. Tonicizations
Chapter 21. Modulations
.

22.1 COMBINING THE CONCEPTS

In the previous two chapters, there was an effort to define tonicization and modulation as two independent processes. Some chromatic passages, however, are not so clearly definable. There are situations in which modulations may be less extended than expected, and tonicizations may be larger than a single secondary dominance.

22.2 TRANSIENT MODULATIONS

There are chromatic passages which closely resemble modulations but do not have a clear cadence in a new key area. These are called TRANSIENT MODULATIONS, and are shown with a bracket platform for the new material and indicating the new key area (in its relationship to the global key).

22.3 EXTENDED TONICIZATIONS

In other circumstances it is easier to think of a chromatic area as an EXTENDED TONICIZATION rather than a transient modulation. Multiple chords can group together to provide a logical harmonic progression in a non-global key. They are shown with a bracket platform for the new material and an arrow pointed to the tonicized chord.

There is no solid way to know the difference between transient modulations and extended tonicizations. Ultimately, it does not matter which one it is...just be clear with the analysis.

22.4 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF HYBRID AREAS

As with tonicizations and modulations, these hybrid areas do not significantly affect structural analysis.

22.5 UPDATED DEFINITION OF VOCABULARY

Information presented in this chapter (and earlier) requires an updated definition of "vocabulary" as given in Chapter 2:
The essential vocabulary is a diatonic pattern of seven stepwise pitches called major and minor scales. Chromatic pitches, the remaining five, can be used, but only to enhance the diatonic ones.

CURRENT CHROMATIC VOCABULARY:

It is useful to have a chart for chromatic vocabulary. Only chromatic scales degrees are included, and they can occur in any voice.

There are other possible chromatic scale degrees associated with tonicizations, but the ones included are the most important to recognize.

ASSIGNMENTS:

ANALYSIS

Describe the phrase design and provide a Roman numeral and structural analysis for the following pieces in Music for Analysis:

  1. Haydn: Sonata in C# Minor, Hob. XVI: 36 [#211, CD track #39]
  2. Bach: Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme [#231, CD track #48]
  3. Handel: Menuet [#234, CD track #50]
  4. Schumann: Sonata, op.118b, Abendlied [#236]

SYNTHESIS

Add soprano, alto, and tenor lines to this figured bass which demonstrates a hybrid area as discussed in this chapter, and include, with eighth notes only, multiple passing tones, neighbor tones, and suspensions (never more than one in any given beat) in the upper three voices. Circle and label the non-chord tones and provide a Roman numeral and structural analysis:

To prepare this writing assignment properly, use the notation guidelines appendix, located at Basic Principles of Music Notation, Semester II.


Links to chapters in this unit:
Chapter 20. Tonicizations
Chapter 21. Modulations

Link to previous unit: DIATONIC PROCEDURES III: Substitutions

Link to next unit: THE ABC's OF CHORALE SETTING


Copyright 2008-2009 by Phillip Magnuson.

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