SOUND PATTERNS

A Structural Examination of Tonality, Vocabulary, Texture,
Sonorities, and Time Organization in Western Art Music

by PHILLIP MAGNUSON

CHROMATIC PROCEDURES II

Modal Mixtures

Chapter 32. Borrowed Chords
Chapter 33. Neapolitan Triad
Chapter 34. Augmented 6th Chords

Introduction

A statistical approach to music theory

The presence of chromatic materials in music is inversely proportional to the difficulty in explaining them. The bulk of harmonic areas found in Common Practice Period music (a hypothetical 85%) will be tonics, dominances, connections, and substitutions. Most of the remaining areas will be tonicizations and modulations (a hypothetical 10%). The remaining 5% will be the exotic chromaticism described in this unit (and the next). These chords are interesting and amazing, but must be kept in perspective in regards to their importance.

Learn more about these chromatic sonorities


Links to other units in Sound Patterns
FUNDAMENTALS
BASIC RULES FOR SPECIES COUNTERPOINT
DIATONIC PROCEDURES I: Harmonic Dimensions
DIATONIC PROCEDURES II: Expanding the Phrase
DIATONIC PROCEDURES III: Substitutions
CHROMATIC PROCEDURES I: Moving from the Global Key
THE ABC's OF CHORALE SETTING
LARGER PERSPECTIVES
CHROMATIC PROCEDURES III: Advanced Vocabulary
THREE ANALYSIS PROJECTS
MICROCOSMS: Musical Styles of the Twentieth Century

Copyright 2008-2009 by Phillip Magnuson.

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