Donald L. Pair, Associate Professor, Geology

Department of Geology, Wohlleben Hall
University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio, 45409-2234
phone: 937.229.2936, fax: 937.229.2889
email:pair@notes.udayton.edu

Education:
B.S., Honors, Geology, St. Lawrence University, 1983
M.Sc., Geology, University of Waterloo, 1986
Ph.D., Geology, Syracuse University, 1991
Don Pair joined the Geology department in 1991. He teaches courses in environmental geology/policy, surface processes, field geology through the departments Colorado Field Camp, and helped develop the Dynamic Earth, the earth systems science course which is part of the Integrated Natural Science Sequence for B.A. students

Research in glacial geology, geomorphology, and enviromental policy has taken Dr. Pair and a number
of undergraduate researchers to locations such as the Adirondack Mountains and Finger Lakes of
New York State, Iceland, and the local Dayton region. He and his students have worked on projects ranging from surficial mapping, paleolandlside, investigations, glacial landform process studies, to
risk assessment studies.

He has also been involved in a number of curriculum development activities. He developed three new
multi-disciplinary environmental courses, a new degree program in Environmental Geolgy (EVG), and
then teamed up with a collegue in Biology to obtain a National Science Foundation instrumentation
grant to support both the Environmental Geology and Environmental Biology degree programs. These efforts culminated in 1997 in an award from the W.M. Keck Foundation to support the renovation of
space in the basement of Wohlleben Hall. The Keck Environmental Laboratory is an undergraduate teaching facility consisting of nine workstations that provide students with analytical instumentation, computer and GIS (Geographic Information System) equipment, small-group conference area, and multimedia presentation area.
Course Syllabi

Selected Publications and Presentations

Supervision of Undergraduate Research

The Keck Environmental Lab

Colorado Field Course